All the News That's Fit to Eat: Week of December 11

At first, I thought there was no real distinct theme to this week's news round-up. It spans from the childhood malnutrition crisis in Syria to the unraveling crisis of sexual harassment in professional kitchens across the country. But, I spent a lot of my week buried in the latest Global Nutrition Report. This report underscores the importance of identifying the links between our global food system, good nutrition, human rights and more. Through that lens then, an argument could be made for exploring the relationship between global hunger, and the rights and treatment of women within and beyond our food system. Addressing both issues requires thinking about broader systems of justice and equity. A world free of hunger is very much linked to a world where there is gender equality. 

On a lighter note, there's also a great episode included here on "the mysteries of olive oil," which inspired me to have my own olive oil taste test. I now regret doing this, as the more expensive olive oil was infinitely more delicious...


Women In The Kitchen Are Not Always A Sexist ClichéForbes
"The image of a woman cooking up a delicious meal in the kitchen is a cliché, often a sexist one. But, Pineapple Collaborative wants to transform that image, by creating a network of women who are combining their love of making delicious food with an entrepreneurial spirit."

A Harvey Weinstein Moment for the Restaurant Industry, New Yorker
"The long-term goal should be to get more women into positions of leadership, whether judging restaurants or running them. Those are the kinds of changes that will force a true evolution in kitchen culture, just as they will in other fields where women are underrepresented at the top. But, in the meantime, we have to keep rooting out the existing problems, one at a time, so that more women actually want to be a part of the restaurant industry in the first place."

Green Gold: Our Love Affair with Olive OilGastropod
"In this episode, Gastropod visits two groves—one in the Old World, one in the New—to get to the bottom of olive oil's many mysteries. Listen in this episode as they find out why the ancient Romans rubbed it all over their bodies, and whether the olive oil on our kitchen counters really is what it says on the label."

Child malnutrition in Syria is at an all time highFood Navigator
Childhood malnutrition in Syria is at its peak since the start of the civil war, with the most dire cases being seen in the youngest of children. This is heartbreaking and preventable.

adas polo o morgh || planting my roots

All the News that's Fit to Eat: Week of Oct 30

Every day, I wake up to a 5:30 a.m. POLITICO morning agriculture news alert, and wind down for the night scrolling through an evening news monitoring report from my colleagues. In between, I'm skimming Twitter, tuning into a food podcast on my walk to work, being heads down in the latest hunger stats - all this is to say, I am drinking from a fire hose when it comes to food news. I need a place to share all the most insightful and thought-provoking articles that come my way, so what better place than Planting My Roots? 

At the close of each week, I'll share an installation in a new series - All The New That's Fit to Eat - where I'll link to the best of the best in food media (at least, to me). Tweet me (@liz_stoltz) the ones the stories that speak to you most, and I'll happily share. 


From Hurricanes to Protest Movements, Food is a Way In, The New York Times
Kim Severson eloquently reflects on her experience reporting on-the-ground during major events and emphasizes that "every news story has a food angle." In light of the chaos of the world today, sometimes there can be nothing better than a nourishing meal. This made for a powerful, beautiful quick read!

Women Aren’t Ruining FoodTaste
"Why do we get so collectively annoyed by food and drink trends that we associate with women? Because it’s an ugly double standard...In general, the language that’s used against women-centric food trends is coded and gendered."

This Is What You Eat When Everyone Is Struggling For FoodBuzzFeed
"There's poverty. Then there's life in Niger, where insurgencies inside and outside its borders are forcing people to forage for food to make up for what international aid can't cover."

Hot Joy's Food Is Almost as Bad as Its Cultural CluelessnessThe Dallas Observer
Heed this advice to avoid the ugly cultural cluster that the owners of the now-closed Hot Joy restaurant found themselves embroiled in: "A useful rule is if you are playing in the domain of moderate to upscale food, then regionalize it...Visit that region at least three times. Immerse yourself. Be curious and humble. Talk to people from there. Cook with people from there. Mostly women. Perhaps take a partner who knows this stuff. Learn the language if you can. Learn the rules in terms of combinations, contrasts, techniques (as you did with French and Italian and Japanese cuisines). Then break the rules. Make interesting food.”

Food Access Advocates Walk The Long Walk ... To The Nearest Grocery StoreNPR
In my own hometown of DC, a 2016 study reported that most (70%) of our supermarkets were packed into our wealthiest neighborhoods. 150,000 residents in poorer areas of the District are served by just three stores. This staggering fact was brought to life during DC Greens' recent Grocery Walk, in which participants walked two miles - the distance far too many in DC have to walk each week for groceries. "I think one of the most powerful impacts of an action like the Grocery Walk is that it silences the myth that poor people don't want healthy food," said Lauren Shweder Biel, executive director of DC Greens.

Dorie Greenspan's World Peace Cookies seem like an appropriate fit for the article "Food is a Way In," don't you think?

Dorie Greenspan's World Peace Cookies seem like an appropriate fit for the article "Food is a Way In," don't you think?